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Английский репетитор по Skype объясняет английские разговорные фразы для начинающих, аудио разговорник английского языка скачать по теме: Составление профессионального портфолио для трудоустройства в США preparingaprofessionalportfolio876.htm

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Welcome English as a Second Language Podcast: Preparing a Professional Portfolio. This is English as a Second Language Podcast. I'm your host Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

This episode is a dialog between Melinda and Chad about preparing a portfolio of your work. Let's get started.

Melinda: Ta da! I’m finally done with my portfolio. Do you want to see it?

Chad: Sure. This portfolio has samples of your work, right?

Melinda: It does, but it’s much more than that. It’s a presentation of the highlights of my career, with examples of my groundbreaking work.

Chad: Uh, okay, if you say so.

Melinda: Let me show you. The first page is a fact sheet of my major accomplishments, clients, jobs, and awards. That’s followed by a more detailed resume. And then, there are some samples of my best work, and finally, there are testimonials from satisfied clients.

Chad: But this is still a work in progress, right?

Melinda: What do you mean?

Chad: Well, your fact sheet is a half a page long. There are two samples of your work, and there are no testimonials, just a blank page.

Melinda: I admit that it’s a little thin right now, but what do you expect? I just started working in the field six months ago. This portfolio shows that there is room for growth.

Chad: Yeah, plenty of room.

Our dialogue begins with Melinda saying to Chad, “Ta da!” That's an expression, “Ta (ta) da (da),” that we use when we are proud of something that were presenting to someone else – like, “Here's something that I painted,” or “Here is my song,” and you show it to the other person because you are proud of it, because you think you did a good job. You say, “Ta da!” – means “Here it is. Look at this!”

Melinda says “I'm finally done with my portfolio.” A “portfolio” is a collection of your work, usually the best things that you have done. If you're an artist, for example, it would be a collection of your pictures; if you're photographer, of your photographs; if you're a writer, perhaps, of some of the things that you've written – any collection of your work that you use either to give to someone who may give you a job – a potential employer – or to give to someone who might want to hire you. So, if you're an architect, you might have a portfolio of the plans that you've drawn of buildings to show to someone who might want to hire you to work for them.

Melinda has a portfolio. She asked Chad if he wants to see it. Chad says, “Sure. This portfolio has samples of your work, right?” “Samples” (sample) is one piece of something that is used to represent a larger group. A sample, in this case, would be one of the things that Melinda has done. An “example,” is another way of saying this.

Melinda says, “It does.” My portfolio does have samples of my work. “But it's much more than that. It's a presentation of the highlights of my career, with examples of my groundbreaking work.” The “highlight (highlight)” of something is the most important or most interesting part of something, the best thing among a group of things. “The highlight of the evening was when I told a joke and everyone laughed.” That probably wouldn't be the highlight of the evening, but that would be an example of what I think is the most important thing that happened during that event. The portfolio has “highlights,” or some of the best things that Melinda has done in her career, in her work experience. “With examples of,” she says, her “groundbreaking work.” “Groundbreaking” is something that is new, something that is interesting, something that no one else has done before.

Chad says, “Uh, okay, if you say so.” What Chad is saying here really is that he thinks Melinda might be bragging a little bit. Melinda might be saying how important she is and of course, no one likes to listen to someone else tell them how important they are. So Chad doesn't really like the way that Melinda is describing herself.

Melinda says, however, “Let me show you.” Let me demonstrate to you by letting you look at something. The first page of her portfolio is a “fact sheet of my major accomplishments, clients, jobs and awards.” A “fact (fact) sheet (sheet) is just what it sounds like – a sheet of paper, a piece of paper, that lists certain important facts about you or about a company or about whatever is the subject of that particular report. In this case, it's a list of the Melinda's “accomplishments, clients, jobs and awards.”

“Accomplishments” are things that you have done – achievements – usually things that are important. It might be, for example, publishing a book. That might be an accomplishment, something that you have done that you're proud of, that's important. “Clients” (clients) are the people who have bought things from you, either your products or your services. A client is the same thing as a customer, someone who buys something from you. It's used more in professional occupations like lawyers, for example, have clients, whereas, if you work at a store, you would just talk about your customers.

Melinda’s fact sheet has a list of her clients, jobs, and awards. An “award” is a prize or an honor given to someone to recognize some good thing that they have done. Maybe they were the best salesman of that month, or maybe someone was the fastest runner in their high school. They might get an award for that. Usually, an award is either a metal or, perhaps, what we would call a “trophy” (trophy). A “trophy” is sort of like a small statue really that people give as an award. An award might also just be a piece of paper that says you have won this award.

Melinda says that the fact sheet that she has is followed by a more detailed resume. When we say it's “followed by,” we mean that after the fact sheet, perhaps underneath it in the portfolio, as you open up the folder where she might have this information, you’d find a resume. A “resume” (resume) is a written document showing your work and education. It's used if you are applying for a job. It's a summary of the places you've worked, the schools you've attended, the things that you've done.

Melinda then says, “And then there are some samples of my best work, and finally there are testimonials from satisfied clients.” A “testimonial” (testimonial) is a written statement or perhaps an audio or video recording from a customer who is happy with whatever they purchased. A “testimonial” usually is a letter or an email that someone sends a company that says, “Wow, I really loved what you sold me. I really love this thing that I purchased from you, I bought.” “Satisfied clients” would be clients who are happy, who are pleased with something, who are pleased with or happy with whatever they bought from you.

Chad says, “But this is still a work in progress right?” A “work in progress” (progress) is something that isn't completed yet. It isn't finished. You haven't done everything you need to do. Melinda says, “What do you mean?” Chad says, “Well, your fact sheet is a half a page long.” In other words, it's not very long. It's just one half of a piece of paper. He says, “There are two samples of your work” – which isn’t very much – “and there are no testimonials, just a blank page.” “Blank” (blank) here means empty, without any words, without any photos, nothing on it. So, she doesn't have any testimonials and she only has two samples of her work.

Melinda says, “I admit that it's a little thin right now.” When she says “it's a little thin,” she means there isn't much in there. There isn't a lot of content. There is not a lot of substance. “But,” she says, “what do you expect?” That question, “What do you expect?” means you should not be surprised. “I just started working in the field” – in this kind of job – “six months ago. This portfolio shows that there is room for growth.” The expression “room for growth” (growth) means that you have opportunities for improvement, that it's not finished, it's not complete. You still have a lot more that you can accomplish. Chad says, “Yeah, plenty of room.”

“Plenty (plenty) of something” is a lot of something – much. “We have plenty of food.” We have a lot of food. Melinda has “plenty of room for growth,” meaning she hasn’t really accomplished very much so far. So, of course, she can only do better in terms of the things she puts in her portfolio.

Let’s listen to the dialog this time at a normal speed.

Melinda: Ta da! I’m finally done with my portfolio. Do you want to see it?

Chad: Sure. This portfolio has samples of your work, right?

Melinda: It does, but it’s much more than that. It’s a presentation of the highlights of my career, with examples of my groundbreaking work.

Chad: Uh, okay, if you say so.

Melinda: Let me show you. The first page is a fact sheet of my major accomplishments, clients, jobs, and awards. That’s followed by a more detailed resume. And then, there are some samples of my best work, and finally, there are testimonials from satisfied clients.

Chad: But this is still a work in progress, right?

Melinda: What do you mean?

Chad: Well, your fact sheet is a half a page long. There are two samples of your work, and there are no testimonials, just a blank page.

Melinda: I admit that it’s a little thin right now, but what do you expect? I just started working in the field six months ago. This portfolio shows that there is room for growth.

Chad: Yeah, plenty of room.

We thank our scriptwriter for her groundbreaking work. I speak, of course, of the wonderful Dr. Lucy Tse.

From Los Angeles, California, I'm Jeff McQuillan. Thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us again.

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