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Практическое разговорное занятие на английском языке для начинающих. Тема: "Назначение и перенос деловой встречи"
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Практическое разговорное занятие на английском языке для начинающих. Тема: "Назначение и перенос деловой встречи"

Оригинальный подкаст, начитанный носителями языка, по которому мы будем работать в ходе урока:

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Объяснения Преподавателя, которое необходимо прослушать ДО урока. Разбор лексики и грамматики основного диалога:

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Практическое разговорное занятие, в ходе которого отрабатывается изученная лексика и грамматические конструкции:

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На этой странице приведены лишь предложения, разобранные в ходе урока. Объяснение Преподавателя и полный урок по этой теме, общение с учащимися, практические задания и ответы на них даны в аудиотреке. Обязательно многократно прослушайте аудиотрек с объяснением на он-лайн плеере!

Данный урок основан на материалах следующих курсов: Разговорная практика для начинающих, Глаголы и глагольные формы (причастие и инфинитив) в ситуациях разговорного общения, Интерактивные тесты на развитие навыков восприятие на слух (IELTS Listening Tests). Изучите все эти материалы и выполните интерактивные тесты ДО изучения этого раздела и подготовки к ролевым играм.

- What is the difference between an appointment and a meeting?
- An appointment is kind of like a meeting one on one.
- Do they call you beforehand to make an appointment?
- Yes, they do. They call me to set at a time and a place well in advance.

- Helene, have you ever been in trouble?
- I have never been in trouble, that was a dictionary definition.

I am going to meet / to have a meeting with my business partner, a person I want to do business with.
Whom are you going to meet (with)?
I am going to meet (with) my business partner.
Who is your business partner?
My business partner is a person I want to do business with.

Tutor: Hello, Alex, I am glad to see you tonight. Thank you for joining us at www.e-english.ru.
Alex: Hello, everyone. I am glad to be here. How are you?
Tutor: I am fine, thank you.
Xenia: Thanks, I am better than ever. And how are you?
Alex: I am fine, thank you.
Xenia: Nice day today, is not it?
Alex: Yes, it is a beautiful day. Do you think tomorrow will be even a better day?
Xenia: I hope so, that is what Yahoo.Weather at my iPhone says.
Tutor: Have you been listening for our class? Have you got any questions to ask?
Alex: I have been listening for the class from the very beginning / since seven p.m. / for an hour and a half and I have got a few questions to ask.
Tutor: Go ahead!
Alex: What is the difference between an appointment and a meeting?
Xenia: An appointment is kind of like a meeting one on one.
Alex: Do they call you beforehand to make an appointment?
Xenia: Yes, they do. They call me to set at a time and a place well in advance.
Alex: Thank you very much, I have got it.

Tutor: Hello, Matvey, I am glad to see you tonight. And thank you for joining us at www.e-english.ru.
Matvey: Hello, everyone. I am glad to be here. How are you?
Tutor: I am fine, thank you.
Olga: Thanks, I am better than ever. And how are you?
Matvey: I am fine, thank you.
Olga: Nice day today, is not it?
Matvey: Yes, it is a beautiful day. Do you think tomorrow will be even a better day?
Olga: I hope so, that is what Yahoo.Weather at my iPhone says.
Tutor: Have you been listening for our class? Is everything clear with this dialogue?
Matvey: I have been listening for the class since seven p.m. Everything is perfectly clear with this dialogue. Olga, have you got any questions to ask?
Olga: Yes, I would like to know what the difference between an appointment and a meeting is.
Matvey: An appointment is kind of like a meeting one on one.
Olga: Do they call you beforehand to make an appointment?
Matvey: Yes, they do. They call me to set at a time and a place well in advance.
Olga: Thank you very much, I have got it.

Teacher: Hello, girls, thank you for having joined us tonight at E-Engish dot Ru!
Tatyana: Hello!
Helene: Hello!
Tatyana: Helene, hello! It is nice to see you again.
Helene: It is nice to be here, Tatyana. How are you?
Tatyana: I am fine! And how are you?
Helene: I am very well, thank you.
Tatyana: That is good. I am sorry I am late. The traffic in Moscow is very bad today.
Teacher: It is no problem. I have got much time left, so we'll be able to cover all the scheduled grammar.
Tatyana: I am glad to hear that.
Helene: By the way, where is Jenny?
Helene: Oh, I am afraid Jenny is ill today. He cannot join our class tonight.
Helene: Oh, I am sorry to hear that.
Teacher: Yes, it is a pity. OK, let us get started with our class.

– Welcome to Business English as it is spoken by professionals in the workplace. Hello, my name is Chris and I am joined today by Daniel and Juliette.

- Hello, everyone!

- Hey, how are you doing?

- And we are going to do an Elementary level show. It is about making appointments, OK? You are trying to make an appointment at work. So, what is an appointment? An appointment [is] kind of like a meeting, right, guys?

- Yea, when you gotta meet someone, they call you beforehand and tell you to meet them there. They make an appointment.

- And it is usually to do business very often.

- And, kind of one on one. So, an appointment is kind of like a meeting, right, guys?

- Yes.

- It is when you formalize it if someone calls you and sets at a time and a place in advance, you are making an appointment.

- OK, a time and a place, right! But usually one on one, right? If you have a big meeting ... I do not know ... we call it a meeting. But an appointment ... I think of usually go[ing] to see a doctor.

- Yes.

- A doctor's appointment.

- A lawyer.

- Something formal.

- OK, when you are in trouble, maybe meet with the lawyers - an appointment.

- I have never been in trouble, that was a dictionary definition.

- OK, OK.

- But also if you are meeting maybe a business partner or someone you want to do business with you can make an appointment to go to their office and see them, OK? So, it is ... I think it is usually you are going to somebody's office and talking to them. So, today's appointment [is] Juliette and Daniel will make an appointment. Who[m] do they make it for? When is it? OK? Listen for those details, all right? So, let us do the dialogue.

- Good morning, Mr. Green's office. Daniel [is] speaking. How may I help you?

- Good morning, my name is Juliette from ABC Windows. Mr. Acureman would like to make an appointment to speak to Mr. Green.

- Certainly, Mr. Green is out of the office this week. But he will be back next Monday. Is Mr. Acureman free on Monday?

- Oh, I am afraid Mr. Acureman has got meeting all day on Monday. How about Tuesday?

- Yes, Mr. Green is free on Tuesday afternoon. How about three?

- Three is good. I will tell Mr. Green three p.m. next Tuesday.

- Thanks for your help, Daniel.

- You are welcome. Good bye!

- Good bye!

- Now, this dialogue was not full-speed. We did this really slowly. So, in real life, business life it goes a little bit faster, but they use this kind of language. So, as you listen to our podcasts keep that in mind. You have to listen to some Elementary podcasts. Then when you are ready listen to some faster levels like Lower-Intermediate and Upper-Intermediate - that is more real life speed. But when your listening is maybe not that great you should practise here you get great language but at a slower speed, OK? So, Daniel and Juliette were talking to each other, but who are they? What were they doing? They were setting up an appointment, making up an appointment, right, but for who[m]? Who[m] were you guys calling about?

- Well, Juliette was calling my office to make an appointment with Mr. Green.

- Yes, and my boss's name was Mr. Acureman.

- OK, so, the appointment should be for Mr. Green and Mr. Acureman. But that is now who you guys are. You guys are kind of like a secretary or assistants or somebody who is helping.

- I am a personal assistant, actually.

- A personal assistant, right!

- Right, and my boss is Mr. Acureman and Daniel's boss is Mr. Green.

- Right, so, Mr. Green, Mr. Acureman, maybe now they are busy. Mr. Green is out of the office. So, Daniel and Juliette are making the appointment.

- Yea, they are trying to find the time when they are both free. When Mr. Acureman and Mr. Green are free to[gether].

- Right, right! So, making the appointment - Daniel, what is that?

- An appointment in advance [is] you decide on a time and place to meet someone.

- Right, you decide before maybe when, where...

- ...when, where, and the time and place and yeah...

- What, yea, the time and place, OK, so day and time. It is really [important]. And they did not say where though. They forgot. Whose office or what restaurant or...?

- Since Juliette was phoning my office she probably wanted to make an appointment with my boss. So, you would assume he would come to us.

- Maybe but that should be more clear than that. They would probably have to call each other back again just to confirm. Now, Juliette you mentioned that "Mr. Green was out of the office".

- That is right. He was not in the office. He was away from the office.

- Away, OK, yeah. Maybe on a business trip, maybe just in another office somewhere doing business. So, when Daniel and Juliette were talking about when, well that person needs to have time to meet time to have an appointment. So Daniel mentioned about "being free", when is Mr. Green free, or Mr. Acureman free.

- "To be free" means that you have nothing else to do at that time. You are available to talk to someone or to meet them.

- Open time kind of, yeah.

- The time you are not booked.

- Here "free" does not mean "no money", OK?

- Or "out of jail".

- Means you have time, have time. OK, Juliette, something a little bit different. You said, "I am afraid Mr. Acureman was, you know, busy, he had meetings".

- Right, that is not that she is fearful, but she is being polite and saying, "I am sorry, Mr. Acureman cannot meet at this time." She is basically not that much apoligizing as if you say, "I am sorry".

- It is being really polite to say, "I am afraid something is not possible". So, she is not afraid, that means to be scared or fearful.

- Right!

- Right?

- That is just like a friend is to come over and visit and I would say, "Oh, I am afraid I have other things to do, I am busy".

- It is like you are saying you are scared, but you are scared to disappoint them. So you are scared to make them scared ... to disappoint.

- So, you use it to be extra polite and nice to people, "I am afraid". And then, Daniel, you make a suggestion, "How about Tuesday?"

- "How about?" is exactly, it is just a suggestion. You could say, "How about Tuesday? How about Wednesday?" It is suggesting the time, place, trying to find time when people are free.

- So, "How about Tuesday?" "How about three o'clock?" or "How about three?"

- or "How about next Monday morning at Starbucks?" it does not matter.

- So, there is lots of... It is a good way to suggest things "How about...?" You usually do not begin a conversation with "How about...?" but you can list things, suggest things. OK, I think it is time to listen to the dialogue again. Let us do it a little faster than before, but I want you to listen for when is this appointment going to be made, OK? They find a little bit of trouble, you know, finding some free time for both Mr. Green and Mr. Acureman. But at the end they finally find a good time to make the appointment.

- Good morning, Mr. Green's office. Daniel [is] speaking. How may I help you?

- Good morning, my name is Juliette from ABC Windows. Mr. Acureman would like to make an appointment to speak to Mr. Green.

- Certainly, Mr. Green is out of the office this week. But he will be back next Monday. Is Mr. Acureman free on Monday?

- Oh, I am afraid Mr. Acureman has got meeting all day on Monday. How about Tuesday?

- Yes, Mr. Green is free on Tuesday afternoon. How about three?

- Three is good. I will tell Mr. Green three p.m. next Tuesday.

- Thanks for your help, Daniel.

- You are welcome. Good bye!

- Good bye!

- OK, great. Just one thing about the time. It is formal and businesslike to say "three o'clock". You can say "three p.m." but normally we understand it is in the daytime it is in the afternoon "three p.m." But the first time I think Daniel said "three", "How about three?" This last time he said, "How about three o'clock?" "Three o'clock" [is] maybe a little more formal, but if you just say "three" that is not bad that is fine as well. Usually it is quite clear that you mean three o'clock in the afternoon. OK? When you make sure that everything [is OK] in the end, Juliette repeated all the key information one more time, she said, "OK, I will Mr. Green three p.m. next Tuesday". OK, she confirmed it. It is...

- Confirmed. Good work!

- Than it is all set. OK? All right! That is all the time we have for today. Thank you for listening and thanks Daniel and Juliette.

- You are welcome.

- No problem!

- Thanks to both of you, OK! And from all of us here we will see you next time at "On Demand English".

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